Cyber victimization: An examination of routine activities and self-control theory as indicators of online victimization

Kelly Schoolcraft, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

Using a sample of online consumers, an examination of routine activities theory and the general theory of crime, specifically self-control, was conducted to assess the effect of cybercrime victimization from FBI, Hitman, ransomware, romance, vehicle, and real-estate scams, in addition to identity theft and credit/debit card fraud. Respondents were solicited by an online survey distribution tool in which 190 people were identified as frequent online shoppers who also use social networking websites. The results indicated that the routine activities and self-control frameworks are not indicators of cybercrime victimizations. Only one attribute from routine activities theory, exposure to motivated offender, was found to have a significant relationship with cybercrime victimization, but the effect was relatively minor. Additionally, demographic variables were assessed and were not found to have a significant relationship with victimization. The sole significant result, which coincides with theory, found that being exposed to a motivated offender increases the likelihood of being victimized. Although other components of routine activities theory and self-control theory were not significant, future research should continue to explore how online activities effect the probability of victimization.^

Subject Area

Social research|Sociology|Criminology

Recommended Citation

Schoolcraft, Kelly, "Cyber victimization: An examination of routine activities and self-control theory as indicators of online victimization" (2015). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI10019386.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI10019386

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