Postmodern literature and Christian commitment

Martha Jeanne Henson Richardson, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

Postmodernism is an abstract term for art; postmodern literature helps us to identify ourselves in the world in relation to culture. Postmodern art opposes absolutes, displays human selfishness, and embodies the struggle between good and evil. The Canon is a basic. Delwin Brown helps identify the place of the Canon in relation to chaos. Can Christian commitment continue in the culture of postmodern literature? YES. I read postmodern literature as lacking spirituality; nevertheless, I agree with D. H. Lawrence who says one has to be spiritual to create art. I wonder if postmodernism is a fuzzy term and Christian commitment is a clear truth and the answer for postmodern mankind. I argue for educators to study the Bible selections when included in the curriculum. The Scriptures wrestle with the nature of good and evil, and help overcome postmodernism's alienation, social disintegration, personal despair, and egocentrism. ^

Subject Area

Literature, Modern|Religion, Philosophy of|Philosophy|Theology

Recommended Citation

Richardson, Martha Jeanne Henson, "Postmodern literature and Christian commitment" (1997). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI1390621.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI1390621

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