Gender differences, social support, and alcohol consumption among college students with depressive symptoms

Sylvia De Vone Johnson, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between gender, social support and alcohol consumption among college students with depressive symptoms. A sample of 105 undergraduate students, (67 females and 38 males) between the ages of 18–21 enrolled in a small historically Black Institution in the Southeast were the participants. Participants completed three instruments. A Demographic Questionnaire which assessed standard demographic indices, history of mental health, and alcohol consumption; The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D), which assessed depressive symptoms; and the Social Support Questionnaire Short Form (SSQSR), which assessed number of perceived available supports and levels of satisfaction with support. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between female and male reported levels of depressive symptoms. As predicted, Pearson correlation revealed a significant and inverse relation between levels of social support and levels of depressive symptoms. Lastly, no relationship was found between alcohol consumption and depressive symptoms. Implications for college programmatic activities, preventive interventions, and study limitations are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Behavioral|Education, Educational Psychology|Health Sciences, Public Health|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Johnson, Sylvia De Vone, "Gender differences, social support, and alcohol consumption among college students with depressive symptoms" (1998). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI1406422.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI1406422

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