Social correlates of breastfeeding among mothers in North Carolina

Vadrin Colvin-King, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

This study examined the social correlates of breastfeeding among mothers in North Carolina, focusing on the Women, Infants, and Children program and maternal education level. Data was obtained from the National Immunization Survey of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study monitors progress toward the Healthy People 2010 objectives of the United States Department of Health and Human Services that 90% of two-year olds are fully vaccinated. Correlations between WIC benefits and breastfeeding were found in a bivariate context, but not during regression analysis. The education level of mother was not statistically significant. Married women are more likely to breastfeed than non-married women. Mothers below poverty are more likely to breastfeed than mothers living above poverty. Being Hispanic is a predictor of breastfeeding. North Carolina does not meet the goals of the Healthy People 2010 objectives that 75% of mothers initiate breastfeeding. This study noted several implications for theory and research in breastfeeding. ^

Subject Area

Women's Studies|Sociology, General|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Vadrin Colvin-King, "Social correlates of breastfeeding among mothers in North Carolina" (January 1, 2006). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. Paper AAI1449348.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI1449348

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