The determinants of tobacco and heavy alcohol use among African-Americans

Tamika Shena Gamble, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

Previous research findings indicate that tobacco use and alcohol use among African-Americans is a major public health issue. The objectives of this study were: (a) to examine the prevalence of tobacco and heavy alcohol consumption risks among African-Americans, (b) to examine whether there are gender differences in tobacco and heavy alcohol consumption risks among African-Americans, and (c) to identify sociodemographic factors that are associated with tobacco and heavy alcohol consumption risks among the African-American population. This study utilized data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which is a telephone-based survey, designed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ^ Analytic strategies utilized were descriptive statistics, chi square, and logistic regression analyses. Bivariate results indicated that there were significant gender differences in tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption risks among African-Americans. Multivariate analyses showed that females were less likely to be at risk of tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption, even after controlling for the effect of other socio-demographic variables. The results of this study suggest the need to examine gender as a critical factor in understanding risks associated with tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption among African-Americans. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Recommended Citation

Gamble, Tamika Shena, "The determinants of tobacco and heavy alcohol use among African-Americans" (2004). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI1449349.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI1449349

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