The effects of attachment insecurity on depression and anxiety among late adolescents in steady dating relationships: The role of perceived social acceptance and emotional reactivity

Sylvia Rich, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The current thesis examined the effects of anxious/avoidant attachment on depression and anxiety and the potential role of social acceptance and partner-specific emotional reactivity as mediators or additive mechanisms in the relations between insecure attachment and psychological maladjustment. Couples completed self report measures of anxious and avoidant attachment and emotional reactivity and rated themselves and their partners on perceived social acceptance and depression/anxiety. Anxious attachment predicted more depression and anxiety and was related to lower social acceptance and higher emotional reactivity scores. Depression and anxiety also predicted lower social acceptance and higher emotional reactivity. Rather than operating as mediators, social acceptance and emotional reactivity had additive effects on depression and anxiety. Thus, anxious attachment, social acceptance, and emotional reactivity all explained significant increments in anxiety and depression variance. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Sylvia Rich, "The effects of attachment insecurity on depression and anxiety among late adolescents in steady dating relationships: The role of perceived social acceptance and emotional reactivity" (January 1, 2006). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. Paper AAI1449363.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI1449363

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