Teachers' perceptions of effective school correlates: Implications for educational leaders

Samuel Lee Edward Henderson, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The dissertation examined the perceptions of public high school teachers regarding effective school correlates and the implications these perceptions had for educational leaders in Cumberland County Public Schools, North Carolina. To accomplish this study, the More Effective School Assessment Instrument (teacher version) including a teacher characteristics profile was administered to 379 public secondary school teachers. The data were treated using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Patterns of perceptions were sought to support the null hypothesis that perceptional differences of public high school teachers in Cumberland County, North Carolina regarding effective school correlates were not significant. Some of the findings in this research were that public high school teachers differ significantly in the areas of ethnicity, certification in major degree areas and years of teaching experience regarding their perceptions of effective school correlates. Over seventy percent of the teachers perceived their schools as being effective. Quality teaching, as measured by teachers' professional development activities, was related significantly to teachers' perceptions of effective school correlates. As the data implicated, there was a consistent progression of perceived effectiveness as the number of teachers' professional development hours increased. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Administration|Education, Teacher Training|Education, Secondary

Recommended Citation

Samuel Lee Edward Henderson, "Teachers' perceptions of effective school correlates: Implications for educational leaders" (January 1, 2000). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. Paper AAI3027008.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3027008

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