An analysis of selected elementary principals' instructional leadership practices and uses of student assessment information in relation to the categorical ratings of schools in North Carolina

Carolyn Douglas Carr, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

A Educational research linking leadership styles to factors associated with effective schools is plentiful (Beck & Murphy, 1996; Glickman, 1999; Goodlad, 2000). However, research is limited in how instructional leadership and uses of student assessment information are related to student achievement. ^ The research questions guiding this study are: (a) What are the instructional leadership practices of elementary principals? (b) How do elementary principals use student assessment information? (c) Are there significant differences between elementary principals' instructional leadership practices and the categorical ratings schools receive? (d) Are there significant differences between elementary principals' uses of student assessment information and the categorical ratings schools receive? (e) Are there significant relationships between elementary principals' demographic data (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender and years as a school administrator) and their instructional leadership practices? (f) Are there significant relationships between elementary school principals' demographic data (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender and years as a school administrator) and their uses of student assessment information?^ Data were collected from 75 elementary principals of pre-kindergarten through fifth grade schools, from 17 counties located in north central North Carolina. Participants had two or more years experience, and receive ratings based on student performance on standardized tests as outlined in the North Carolina ABCs Education Reform Accountability Plan. The Elementary Principal Survey: Utilization of Student Assessment Information developed by Fleck and Hays (1999) was the research instrument. ^ The statistical methods used to analyze data included an ANOVA, Chi-Square, and Pearson Correlation. The ANOVA results indicated no significant differences exist between instructional leadership practices, uses of student assessment information and categorical ratings. The Chi-Square results identified decision-making as a dominant instructional leadership practice and monitoring student achievement levels as a dominant use of assessment information, among all principals. The Pearson Correlation tests revealed no significant relationship between instructional leadership and race. However, a relationship did exist between leadership and gender and years as an administrator. The Pearson Correlation also indicated no significant relationship between uses of assessment information and principals' demographic data. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Administration|Education, Elementary

Recommended Citation

Carolyn Douglas Carr, "An analysis of selected elementary principals' instructional leadership practices and uses of student assessment information in relation to the categorical ratings of schools in North Carolina" (January 1, 2002). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. Paper AAI3345788.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3345788

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