A qualitative study on the leadership characteristics that impact school culture, school climate, and school academic performance in selected North Carolina schools

Mellotta Battle Hill, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

School leaders are challenged with the daily responsibilities of ensuring that their schools meet federal and state guidelines for accountability. The principal, as the instructional leader, sets the tone for teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to understand and examine principals' perceptions of leadership characteristics and factors that impacted school culture, school climate, and school academic performance in selected North Carolina public schools. The purpose of this study was also to determine the dominate leadership characteristics of selected North Carolina principals based on Bolman and Deal's (1997) four leadership frames.^ This qualitative study examined two rural North Carolina school districts that, despite challenges and barriers, showed academic progress. The study focused on the leadership frame of each principal and how practices and characteristics impacted student achievement at their respective school. Several recurring themes and patterns emerged from the data collected from the 16 participants: (a) student-centered, (b) highly qualified and dedicated faculty, (c) team approach, (d) leadership, (e) instructional leadership, (f) collaborative leadership structure, (g) leading change, and (f) balanced accountability and responsibility. The researcher recommended that this study be replicated to include administrators from urban and suburban districts to compare perceptions and experiences between the two groups.^

Subject Area

Education, Leadership

Recommended Citation

Hill, Mellotta Battle, "A qualitative study on the leadership characteristics that impact school culture, school climate, and school academic performance in selected North Carolina schools" (2014). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3581416.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3581416

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