The relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions of the working conditions in North Carolina elementary schools and student achievement

Sylvia Jean Mizzelle, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions on the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey (TWC) and the influence this relationship had on student achievement. A quantitative research design using a Multiple Linear Regression investigated the relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions measured by the TWC and its relationship to student achievement. Data for the study were collected using archival data from the TWC survey and EOG test data from Grades 3-5. The findings from this study revealed that: (a) the degree of congruence was related to student achievement; as congruence waxed and waned so did student achievement; (b) the source of congruence influenced the manner in which student achievement was impacted model; (c) the congruence model, although statistically significant, accounted for a small portion of the variance in student achievement; and, (d) a supplemental analysis revealed that teachers' perceptions accounted for more variation in student achievement than principals' perceptions. An implication for leadership is that although principals' perceptions are related to student achievement, teachers' perceptions account for more variation in student performance. Therefore, it is recommended that principals' have a better understanding of the TWC and how teachers' perceptions are related to student performance to promote better working conditions and test scores. ^

Subject Area

Education, Leadership|Education, Administration|Education, General

Recommended Citation

Mizzelle, Sylvia Jean, "The relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions of the working conditions in North Carolina elementary schools and student achievement" (2012). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3581424.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3581424

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