Principals' perceptions of early college education in relation to student behavior, school climate, and academic achievement in selected North Carolina schools

Sheldon Darrell Harvey, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

Due to the teaching and learning accountabilities that guide the evaluation process of public school principals, it is essential to examine whether early college education is a factor in academic achievement, student behavior, and school climate. It is equally important to determine whether early college education influence students decision to continue their college experience after high school graduation. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine selected North Carolina principals' perceptions of early college education in relation to student behavior, academic achievement, and school climate. Principals were also asked to give their perceptions of the impact early college education has on graduation and post-secondary opportunities.^ The six principals involved in this study possessed a passion for education and expressed a passion for teaching and learning. Principals freely shared their perceptions on academic achievement, school climate, and student behavior in early colleges. Based on their responses the following recurring 16 themes emerged: (a) professional development, (b) college readiness, (c) distractions, (d) teacher collaboration, (e) academic tracking, (f) sense of competition, (g) academic behavior (h) code of conduct, (i) peer intervention, (j) values (k) family atmosphere, (1) leadership, (m) community outreach, (n) college readiness, (o) academic incentives, and (p) student satisfaction. The results of this study have the potential to provide educators with strategies for developing the most effective and nurturing learning environment for high school students. The results could also give school leaders an understanding of the early college learning environment and its impact on academic achievement, school behavior, school climate.^ The following recommendations were derived from the researcher's experience and results of the study: (a) recommend the study be replicated to include early college teachers' and students' perceptions of the benefits of early college education, (b) track the academic careers of early college graduates to discover whether attending early college actually motivates students to attend post-secondary institutions, and (c) expand to include classroom observations of early college classes to determine if the rigorous instruction actually prepares students for college readiness skills.^

Subject Area

Education, General

Recommended Citation

Harvey, Sheldon Darrell, "Principals' perceptions of early college education in relation to student behavior, school climate, and academic achievement in selected North Carolina schools" (2014). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3581425.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3581425

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