North Carolina High School African American males perceptions of the external and internal factors contributing to academic achievement

Clinton La Mont Robinson, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore African American males' perceptions of the external and internal factors contributing to their academic achievement. Despite the odds against them in regards to the educational system, such as, their low rates of high school completion (Lynn et al., 2010; Schott Foundation, 2010); and their under preparedness for the rigors of college-level work (Bonner and Bailey, 2006; Palmer, Davis, and Hilton, 2009; Palmer and Young, 2009) many do excel.^ The researcher interviewed thirteen (13) African American males in two selected North Carolina High Schools. The African American male participants were in the top 20% of all African American males in their graduating Class of 2013. As a result of the interviews, seven overarching themes were identified as factors contributing to their academic achievement. The external factors identified were: (a) future aspirations, (b) parental expectations, and (c) life occurrences. The internal factors identified were: (a) being connected to school, (b) peer relationships, (c) school occurrences, and (d) teacher relationships. The participants also shared their perceptions regarding: (a) the role race or ethnicity played toward their academic achievement, and (b) the characteristics of a good teacher. Finally, they gave advice for other African American males on how to succeed academically. The implications for change focused on: (a) programs specifically designed for African American males, (b) academic training for African American males, (c) cultural diversity training for educators, and (d) parental education seminars.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Black Studies|Education, Secondary

Recommended Citation

Robinson, Clinton La Mont, "North Carolina High School African American males perceptions of the external and internal factors contributing to academic achievement" (2014). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3581426.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3581426

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