An analysis of the impact of institutional characteristics on African American male graduation rates from North Carolina Community Colleges

Ophelia Munn-Goins, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze institutional support characteristics on graduation rates of African American males from North Carolina Community Colleges. Eleven community colleges were identified and invited to participate in the study of which seven agreed to participate. The researcher received six responses from the seven institutions; thus, there were a total of 63 survey respondents who completed the 2 Year Student Opinion Survey. The researcher utilized a quantitative methodology. The research design used correlation analysis. The findings consisted of participants' perception being neither a positive or negative towards their community college. The mean for participants' perception of the challenge offered by their program was 2.492. The mean of participants' perception of their flexibility design of their own program of study was 5.016. Correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between race and age, race and marital status, college grade point average, and number of years attended any college. Recommendations for future research include a larger sample consisting of more ethnic groups and females. In addition, it is recommended that the effectiveness of male mentoring programs on graduation and extending these programs to females is also studied for future research. ^

Subject Area

Community college education|African American studies|Black studies|Adult education

Recommended Citation

Munn-Goins, Ophelia, "An analysis of the impact of institutional characteristics on African American male graduation rates from North Carolina Community Colleges" (2015). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3664596.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3664596

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