A statistical analysis of student perceptions of teacher confirmation in selected institutions

William Gregory Thomas, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

This dissertation examines the relationship between race, gender, and type of institution attended and student perceptions of teacher confirmation (teacher concern with student well-being and learning) in a basic public speaking course. This quantitative study made use of an online survey to collect both demographic information and student perceptions of Teacher Confirmation, using the Teacher Confirmation Scale developed by Kathleen Ellis (2000)from 366 students at three institutes of higher learning in Southeastern North Carolina. The study examined four research questions that attempted to identify correlations between race (and race-matching), gender (and gender-matching), institution type, academic performance, and student perceptions of teacher confirmation. This dissertation revealed four major findings. First, Black students perceived significantly lower levels of teacher confirmation in the basic public speaking course. Second, students in general perceived significantly lower levels of teacher confirmation from female teachers than they did from male teachers in the basic public speaking course. Third, there was no significant correlation between the types of institution attended and perceived teacher confirmation. Fourth, a weak, positive correlation existed between student performance course and student perceptions of teacher confirmation. These findings demonstrate that, in the basic public speaking course, Black students and students with female teachers (regardless of institution type) might be at a disadvantage and are thus likely to suffer from lower levels of performance in the course. ^ This research allows for a better understanding of the factors that affect student perceptions of teacher confirmation so as to be able to better control those perceptions through adaptation of teacher immediacy behaviors. An increased ability to consciously affect perception of teacher confirmation would provide increased opportunity to increase student affect for the teacher and the course material as well as overall student achievement in the respective course. As such, this research may be used by teachers and administrators to increase student performance and student retention.^

Subject Area

Educational leadership

Recommended Citation

Thomas, William Gregory, "A statistical analysis of student perceptions of teacher confirmation in selected institutions" (2014). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI3664598.
http://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI3664598

Share

COinS