The Rise Program and Stem Choices Examining the Relationship Between Minority Students' Participation in the Rise Program and Academic Performance: Implications on Stem-Related Choices

Ukamaka Ifeyinwa Umerah, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

It is arguable that the United States (US) lags behind in global competitiveness in regard to providing an adequate supply of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workers. Technological innovation is the main driver of United States (US) economic growth. As the diversity of the United States population increases and is compounded by an underrepresentation of minority students pursuing a STEM-related degree, there is an increased need for minority students to pursue careers in STEM fields in the United States (US). This study examined if minority students' participation in the Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) program was related to their academic performance, preparedness for all classes and majoring and graduating in STEM-related fields. The study employed the science identity conceptual framework, which argues that minority students need to have science identities, competence, performance, and recognition as "science persons." The research questions which guided this study were: Is there a relationship between students' participation in the RISE program activities and their (a) decided STEM majors and (b) STEM graduates as compared to non-program participants?; Is there a relationship between students' STEM-related academic performance and their participation in the RISE program as compared to non-program participants?; and Is there a relationship between students' preparedness for math, science, and other courses and their participation in the RISE program compared to non-program participants? A quantitative design was employed in data analysis, including RISE scholars' cumulative Grade Point Averages (GPA), STEM GPAs, and major's data. The Average Treatment Effect on the Treated (ATET), was calculated using the "teffects" command in Stata. The results were that (a) RISE program participants had significantly higher STEM GPAs and cumulative GPAs versus non-RISE students and (b) decided to major in and graduate from STEM related fields more frequently than non-RISE particpants. The results may inform the federal government, policy makers, and educational leaders of the advantages of funding and establishing the RISE program in schools. It is recommended that further studies be performed using all RISE programs in schools in US.^

Subject Area

Mathematics|Educational leadership|Nuclear engineering

Recommended Citation

Umerah, Ukamaka Ifeyinwa, "The Rise Program and Stem Choices Examining the Relationship Between Minority Students' Participation in the Rise Program and Academic Performance: Implications on Stem-Related Choices" (2017). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI10991770.
https://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI10991770

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