The Impact of Classroom Climate, Support Services, and Instructors' Behaviors on the Academic Success of Military Students': Implications for Change

Molly Noble Williams, Fayetteville State University

Abstract

The city Fayetteville, North Carolina, is historically a military city due to its adjacency to Fort Bragg, which is the world's largest Army installation. It is the home of the XVIII Airborne Corps and 82nd Airborne Division, and more than 55,000 military service members and over 12,000 civilian personnel. The continuing reduction of forces in Iraq and Afghanistan has led to increase enrollment of military students in higher education in the United States and globally. The first group of student veterans who enrolled in higher education after the tragedy of September 11, 2001 realized that strong institutional support was not available. As a result, the explanatory sequential research design was used to explore, analyze, and compare the viewpoints of military students regarding classroom climate, support services, and instructors' behavior at selected North Carolina institutions of higher education. The research included students, educators, administrators, and staff at two universities and one community college. The participants of the study were 141 undergraduate and graduate military students and military-connected students, and nine institutional leaders of higher education. The study compared qualitative and quantitative assessment of identical on-line survey questionnaires distributed to military students and military-connected students at three institutions of higher education. A follow-up focus group was conducted and the results were aggregated.^

Subject Area

Educational leadership|Military history|Military studies

Recommended Citation

Williams, Molly Noble, "The Impact of Classroom Climate, Support Services, and Instructors' Behaviors on the Academic Success of Military Students': Implications for Change" (2017). ETD Collection for Fayetteville State University. AAI10991771.
https://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/dissertations/AAI10991771

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